Painting

Peter Halley – Four Decades of Drawings

Posted in Drawing, Film / Video, Kodalith, Painting on April 12th, 2011 by Moose – 5 Comments

Day-glo acrylics are not the sole medium of this New York-born abstract artist. Abstract may not be the appropriate term to use, though—the artist himself prefers to call his work “diagrammatic” because of the concreteness and deliberateness of each element in his paintings and drawings. Though Peter Halley’s works are often remembered as a number of his earliest, bright, minimalist pieces, Halley has run through and around different methods to craft his compositions. His latest exhibit, Drawings: Four Decades is a collection of much of the driving force behind his work, including paint studies on paper, digital animation, and photomechanical prints—many of which have never been exhibited before.

Peter Halley - Tree in Landscape, 1977

Peter Halley - Tree in Landscape, 1977

Despite the variations in Peter’s work, much of it can be described with the same qualifiers and often has very similar messages; straight lines symbolizing prison cells or strict order drawing our attention to those things that control or enslave all of us. Several of his line drawings from the eighties draw this theme out again and again, particularly comparing apartment complexes to penitentiaries.

Peter Halley - Prisons: Indoors and Outdoors, 1981

Peter Halley - Prisons: Indoors and Outdoors, 1981

Peter Halley - Apartment House, Prison, 1981

Peter Halley - Apartment House, Prison, 1981

Currently exhibiting at the Gering & López gallery in New York through April 23, Drawings: Four Decades includes works done using a photomechanical process on kodalith, an oft forgotten monochromatic film. Of the selections in the exhibit made in this process, the gallery press release reads:

Also in the exhibition is a variety of works from the early 1980s in which Halley maps his developing concern with post-industrial space — first in a series of simple mechanical pen drawings on graph paper, then in his “Kodaliths.” In these, Halley’s drawings are printed on mylar as photographic negatives, thus yielding an ethereal clear line on a film-like black background. As Halley’s work with Kodaliths progresses through the mid-80s, he focuses less on articulating his new world of prisons, cells, and, conduits, and more on the re-presentation of simple words and phrases taken from the realm of packaging and highway signage in works like “Digitally Mastered” and “Maintain Speed”.

Peter Halley - The Meaning of Production, 1981

Peter Halley - The Meaning of Production, 1981

Peter Halley - Voyage to a City, 1981

Peter Halley - Voyage to a City, 1981

Among the expected line drawings, post-modern paintings, and film work are a pair of large-format flowcharts. Created in the mid-1990s, Halley’s emphasis fell on society’s attention to processes and the automation of once organic actions and thoughts.

Peter Halley - Is Response Improved?, 1995

Peter Halley - Is Response Improved?, 1995

A number of the more recent pieces in the collection resemble very much the space he explored with his early Day-glo pieces; order, chaos, interconnectedness, and separation all explored within the same constraints of minimalist lines and square shapes.

Peter Halley - Untitled, 2008

Peter Halley - Untitled, 2008

Peter Halley - Untitled, 2010

Peter Halley - Untitled, 2010

Are Halley’s works post-modern masterpieces? Make yourself heard below.

Exhibition page at Gering & López.
Article from Contemporary Art.
Peter Halley’s personal website.

Camille Rose Garcia – Fairytale From The Black Lagoon

Posted in Drawing, Mixed Media, Painting on April 11th, 2011 by Moose – Be the first to comment
Camille Rose Garcia - White Swan With Potion

Camille Rose Garcia - White Swan With Potion

Camille Rose Garcia is most popularly known for contributing the illustrations to the New York Times bestseller Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. This Los Angeles-based, lowbrow artist, however, has a far wider-reaching career than reinterpreting the works of Lewis Carroll. Over a dozen gallery exhibits and three books across the last decade have made Garcia’s style and tone recognizable to even the more casual art enthusiasts, even if unaware of the artist’s full body of work.

Camille Rose Garcia - Mirror, Black Mirror

Camille Rose Garcia - Mirror, Black Mirror

“Sneewittenhen und die Schwarze Lagune” or “Snow White And The Black Lagoon” was displayed in the Michael Kohn gallery from March 12 to April 9, 2011. Garcia has included among the collective works in the exhibition glitter-and-gold-leaf paintings in acrylic, ink and pencil drawings on tattered paper, and mixed media portraiture in vintage frames representing mirrors. The gallery press release says of Garcia’s exhibit:

Referencing the classic German Fairy tale, as well as the animated film by Walt Disney, Garcia weaves a monstrous modern and dysfunctional narrative using cartoony, Jungian archetypes, a psychedelic saturated color palette, and an obtuse combination of action-painter brush strokes and carefully controlled, calligraphic line work. Gold leaf and black glitter hang out together on the paintings in an uncomfortable but tolerated relationship. Leaking black castles, oily witches, and a gang of tired and dizzy dwarf miners accompany the Snow White and her fragile entourage of forest and lagoon animals as they traverse through caves, lagoons, and compromised natural landscapes, searching for an elusive happy ending.

Camille Rose Garcia - Hunters and Warriors

Camille Rose Garcia - Hunters and Warriors

Camille Rose Garcia - Dreamtime Battle

Camille Rose Garcia - Dreamtime Battle

Camille Rose Garcia - Children Wake Up

Camille Rose Garcia - Children Wake Up

Garcia is generally classified as producing gothic fairytales, with unsettling cartoons and a downright creepy tone throughout her oeuvre. Definitely fitting the mark are the vintage framed works within “Black Lagoon.” The mixed media works are set into the frame forming the image of a reflection in a looking glass of sorts, the subject of each attempting to frame an allegory between the familiar märchen and our current relationship with nature and society.

Camille Rose Garcia - Leaky Empires

Camille Rose Garcia - Leaky Empires

Camille Rose Garcia - Slow Ghost

Camille Rose Garcia - Slow Ghost

Is the exhibit deserving of a royal wedding, or is it more suited to dine on poisoned apples? Cast your votes.

Exhibitions at the Michael Kohn gallery.
Selected works from Sneewittenhen und die Schwarze Lagune.
Camille Rose Garcia’s personal .

Acrylic Dreams – Sakai Reiko

Posted in Painting on March 8th, 2010 by Moose – Be the first to comment

Born on 6 June at 6 o’clock, Sakai Reiko came into this world under the mark of the beast. The Japanese artist displayed a natural talent for art—specifically calligraphy and painting—at a young age, likely influenced by both her pianist mother and her grandmother’s craft skills. In recent exhibitions, body painting and live painting have drawn great interest to the artist, but she is still best known for her works in acrylic which are being featured in New York’s Agora Gallery.

Sakai Reiko - Dragon

Sakai Reiko - Dragon

Agora’s “Matrix Of The Mind” exhibit—which features Reiko alongside more than a dozen other contemporary, Japanese artists— attempts to match the modern and the timeless with their varied, unique contributions to the gallery, chosen for their illustration of the natural world and the spiritual mind. Reiko describes her spiritual journey on canvas to Agora:

I began to draw when I was very young, usually abstract pictures. When I was older I became a graphic designer and free-lance illustrator, but I soon came to understand that that was not enough for me. I knew that I would not find fulfilment [sic] by doing anything other than actually painting, and set out on a journey of self-discovery to find what I was looking for. The result is that I have learned that I want to aim at something in my art, to speak to the viewer and convey to them my feelings. My experience in design and illustration has helped me with this, but the most important factor is my determination and my love of art.

Sakai Reiko - Fireworks

Sakai Reiko - Fireworks

More of Reiko’s work can be seen on Agora’s website. “Matrix Of The Mind” runs until 19 March 2010.

Strokes of genius, or the mark of the beast? Vote below.

Shades of Red and Blac – Suzzan Blac

Posted in Painting on March 1st, 2010 by Moose – 3 Comments

It’s easy to describe Suzzan Blac’s work at a basic, visual level. Dark. Bold. Violent. Gory (Blac is the self-proclaimed “goddess of gore”). It becomes more and more difficult, however, to classify Blac’s work when moving from mood and tone to purpose and statement. Blac’s subject matter is generally tortured bodies, blood, pierced skin, blood, screaming faces, and did I mention blood? Her latest work, Onus is visually more tame and restrained than the majority of her body of work, but evokes pained and tortured emotions as much as any other piece.

NSFW - Click Here To View Image

More of Suzzan’s work can be found at the Beinart Collective and on Suzzan’s RedBubble page.

Is Onus a mastery of the macabre? Decide below.

New work found at the Museum of Weird Art (MOWA).