Sculpture

Shain Erin – Delicate Dolls

Posted in Mixed Media, Sculpture on September 2nd, 2011 by Moose – 1 Comment

Lots of people love dolls. Children and adults alike are transfixed by the bundles of ceramic and fabric that have brought joy and comfort to so many. It’s easy to see that these objects can often be more than just an item of affection, but also an extension of the owner’s personality and self-view. Commercial dolls, however, can sometimes be too aesthetically pleasing. No one is without at least a blemish or scar of some sort. And not everyone fits into the classical view of beautiful, pretty, or even normal.

Conjoined Triplets

Conjoined Triplets

Shain Erin has created a unique collection of non-traditoinal art/fashion doll sculptures that many describe as creepy or disturbing. His mixed media creations explore the ability of the doll to emulate living entities more so than a painting or drawing, and still remain an object fashioned out of inanimate parts.

Fallen

Fallen

Study for a Portrait of a Human Soul (Female Figure)

Study for a Portrait of a Human Soul (Female Figure)

Shain refers to his pieces as “morbid fine art” and “monsters” that often resemble a collection of medical oddities, though only Babette (following) seems to be loosely based on a real medical condition, hypertrichosis, famously belonging to Kung Fu grandmaster Su Kong T’ai Djin and sideshow performer Stephan Bibrowski.

Babette, the Beastly Beauty

Babette, the Beastly Beauty

Not all of the dolls resemble living creatures, though Shain will argue the dolls are likely more a representation of the soul more than a body. Edgar Allan Poe’s last poem, “Annabel Lee” is the inspiration behind Shain’s doll of the same name. The distinguishable bright eyes of the poem’s fallen maiden are haunting on the doll’s visage, and her gaunt appearance and pale skin beg the viewer to wonder if the form is a spectre or a corpse found in the sepulchre.

Annabel Lee

Annabel Lee

Many of Shain’s sculptures, dolls, and poppets now belong in private collections as the artist, through the use of several online outlets, has made his art easily accessible to those who appreciate it.

Sentinel

Sentinel

Creepy or captivating? Tell us what you think below.

Photos courtesy of the artist’s website.
Shain Erin on: Artbreak | Etsy | DeviantArt | Flickr

Tim Noble and Sue Webster – Nasty Projectionists

Posted in Installations, Light/Illumination, Sculpture, Shadow on April 19th, 2011 by Moose – 1 Comment

Nasty. There really isn’t another word to describe the works of Tim Noble and Sue Webster. The British duo have collaborated on projects since 1996 that have spanned the realms of light and shadow, illumination and the dark, yet are, for all intents and purposes, trash.

Dirty White Trash (With Gulls)

Dirty White Trash (With Gulls)

Don’t assume that this is any critique of the work from the connotation of the word. The artists may take the statement as a compliment. While Noble and Webster create many lighted sculptures, another oft-used medium of the pair is that of used goods (i.e. trash). The work that Noble and Webster display, however, is not just the created pile of trash (which in the case of Dirty White Trash was 6 collected months of the artists’ trash and a pair of dead seagulls), but the projection of the shadow of the work from a fixed position. Their first shadow sculpture, Miss Understood and Mr Meanor, drew huge crowds when they exhibited it in 1997.

Miss Understood and Mr Meanor

Miss Understood and Mr Meanor

Keeping with the theme of heads on pikes, Noble and Webster presented Dark Stuff over a decade later: another pair of unfortunate crania, this time crafted out of 189 mummified animals including rats, crows, and a fox.

Dark Stuff

Dark Stuff

The shadow work of the artists is not always as macabre as impaled, disembodied heads. Quite a bit of their work, both light and shadow, is lighthearted and easily relatable, or at the very least, uninterested in the topic of death, at least on the surface.

Wasted Youth

Wasted Youth

The Original Sinners

The Original Sinners

A common focus in their shadow sculptures are couples (Noble and Webster having been partners for some time before marrying in 2008 may have played a part in their subject matter), many which are seen as self portraits. Each work is painstakingly created out of innumerable pieces of trash, each painstakingly placed to ensure the shadow is created with striking detail. But not all of their works are based on a pair of lovers or compatriots. Sunset Over Manhattan brings a skyline to life out of aluminum cans, peppered with holes created by air pistols.

Sunset Over Manhattan

Sunset Over Manhattan

While each work is designed to be viewed from a certain perspective for the shadow to appear properly, not all works have a single shadow. For Cheap and Nasty, an electronic mechanism rotates the pair of faces between two different views. The work at once shows duality within a person, a being and a façade, each hidden in the shadow of the other.

Cheap and Nasty

Cheap and Nasty

Cheap and Nasty (alternate view)

Cheap and Nasty (alternate view)

Yet, at the very heart of their pieces, there is a universally dirty, yet natural and accepted, quality to their work.

HE/SHE

HE/SHE

Are Noble and Webster’s sculptures nasty, or are they just plain rubbish? Let us know below.

Article found via WebUrbanist.
Photos courtesy ofDeitch and Gagosian.
The artists’ personal webpage.

Paul Kolker – Sculpting Light

Posted in Light/Illumination, Sculpture on April 13th, 2011 by Moose – Be the first to comment

Geometric shapes and neon lights befitting of the next TRON reboot fill the studio space of this Brooklyn-born artist. Paul Kolker has made a name for himself out of his integration of mathematical theory and scientific concepts to his painting and other artworks. It’s no surprise that this former chief of cardiothoracic surgery applies so much quantitative process to his works to depict them qualitatively.

Paul Kolker - Infinity Vortex of Light Sculptures

Paul Kolker - Infinity Vortex of Light Sculptures

A number of Paul Kolker’s works implement his own color and art theory he has dubbed “fracolor.” This process transforms an image into pixelated dots of fractal components of the original. The result is a very clear representation of the image from afar but a very fractured and almost abstract grouping of circles when viewed closely. In his current installation, Let There Be Light!, Kolker displays a selection of his unique light “sculptures,” exploring depth and physical space in concrete forms via illumination. Similar to the fracolor experience, the lights in each group are little more than individual dots alone (even less than the paintings as their very being is a testament to their impermanence) yet create an image much more substantive than the shape it is symbolizing.

Paul Kolker - Iterati Triangulare, Green

Paul Kolker - Iterati Triangulare, Green

Paul Kolker - Star Light, Star Bright

Paul Kolker - Star Light, Star Bright

Kolker’s “sculptures” are simply meant to be seen to be wholly appreciated. The fullness of Kolker’s Star Light, Star Bright for instance is difficult to capture in a photograph, especially when depth and angle are such intricate facets of the work. The best living example of this is this photograph of the above mentioned work.

Can light have form, or will Kolker’s work vanish into darkness? Make your choice below.

Photos courtesy of Opening Ceremony.
The artist’s personal website.
Let There Be Light! can be viewed at Studio 601 through May 5th.

Jessica Jackson Hutchins – Furniture In Form

Posted in Mixed Media, papier-m̢ch̩, Sculpture on February 9th, 2011 by Moose Р1 Comment

Jessica Jackson Hutchins’ papier-mâché works, such asUntitled (Darth Vader), have in the past often been described as sophomoric and criticized heavily by art critics. But when the Oregon-based artist opened her Stylite Optimism show in 2007, some critics began to take notice. Highly debated are whether her art has evolved into a mature venue of expression, or are merely a random presentation of found objects and plaster. Her recent solo exhibition, Kitchen Table Allegory, was seen at the Derek Keller Gallery in New York this past March.

Jessica Jackson Hutchins - Kitchen Table Allegory

Jessica Jackson Hutchins - Kitchen Table Allegory

Jessica Jackson Hutchins - Kitchen Table Allegory (detail)

Jessica Jackson Hutchins - Kitchen Table Allegory (detail)

Jessica Jackson Hutchins - Convivium

Jessica Jackson Hutchins - Convivium

Jessica Jackson Hutchins - Orange Bowl

Jessica Jackson Hutchins - Orange Bowl

A number of the works in Hutchins’ new exhibits are repurposed furniture, covered or reupholstered, and placed in scenes with cast hydrocal or ceramic. Often featured is Couple, one of the staple points in Kitchen Table Allegory‘s press release:

Another large sculpture entitled Couple incorporates a worn loveseat which has been covered by two spray-painted papier-mâché mounds; a ceramic vessel is perfectly nestled between the mounds. The work could be described alternatively as: a mountain range dappled by purple light, a woman’s breasts cradling a precious infant, or a couple groping one another on a couch. A similar formal multiplicity can be found in the chair-like Recliner and in True Love Forever. Both works have surfaces collaged with magazine images of scenic countrysides and gem-like flowers and niches which support richly glazed ceramic vessels; they are at once bodies and landscapes and furniture.

Jessica Jackson Hutchins - Couple

Jessica Jackson Hutchins - Couple

Indefinite Break (Tiger Woods)

Jessica Jackson Hutchins - Indefinite Break (Tiger Woods)

Jessica Jackson Hutchins - Untitled (Darth Vader)

Jessica Jackson Hutchins - Untitled (Darth Vader)

Jessica Jackson Hutchins - Couch For A Long Time

Jessica Jackson Hutchins - Couch For A Long Time

Hutchins’ other solo exhibitions for 2010 included Over Come Over at Small A Projects/Laurel Gitlen in New York, Children of the Sunshine at the Portland Institute of Contemporary Art, and Champions at the Timothy Taylor Gallery in London.

Jessica Jackson Hutchins - Figure With Red Bowl (from Over Come Over)

Jessica Jackson Hutchins - Figure With Red Bowl (from Over Come Over)

Jessica Jackson Hutchins - Children of the Sunshine (Installation view)

Jessica Jackson Hutchins - Children of the Sunshine (Installation view)

Jessica Jackson Hutchins - Champions

Jessica Jackson Hutchins - Champions

Hutchins is anticipating a new exhibition at the Atlanta Contemporary Art Center this year, but do her works stand on artistic form, or merely physical shape? Vote and let us know what you think.

Photos courtesy of ArtNet and the Portland Institute of Contemporary Art.