Posts Tagged ‘photography’

Maurizio Anzeri – A Stitch In Time

Posted in Embroidery, Fiber, Photography on November 1st, 2011 by Moose – Be the first to comment

What do you do with old portraits? Portraits of people long forgotten. Portraits ready to be thrown in the bin, or filed away in a drawer that will likely not be opened again for a long time. Many people truly enjoy the nostalgia of black and white photographs, even if the subjects are unknown to them. But whence comes the artistic value of the photograph? It would appear that Maurizio Anzeri has found this unique aesthetic and would very much like to share it with us.

Round Midnight

Round Midnight

Following a study in ink drawing and embroidery, the Italian-born artist began stitching on photographs, using the unique geometry of the figures to direct the outcome of the final product. Symmetry, rhythm, form, function, order, and cacophony—all hidden behind the familiar lines of the human form. The focus of Anzeri’s photo-sculptures (a term he coined for his pieces) is often solely the face of the subject. Crafting masks with fiber, Anzeri paints a new character on the old portrait, one found burrowed beneath the formality of the camera displaying solely what it can see.

Marcel

Marcel

Robert

Robert

The compositions flow between the bold and the beautiful, highlighting features about each figure. The color choices are often striking, standing out against the monochromatic or sepia tones of recorded light from times forgotten.

Nicola

Nicola

Rita

Rita

Anzeri works now out of London and has been featured in the Saatchi gallery as well as BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art and his work has been featured in original commissions for Dazed and Confused.

Nadia

Nadia

Should the needle and thread be left to the tailor, or can you stitch emotion into a still frame? Vote below.

Maurizio Anzeri at Yatzer, Saatchi Gallery, BALTIC, and Dazed and Confused.

Dust to Dust – Ujin Lee and Tom Edwards

Posted in Photography on February 11th, 2011 by Moose – Be the first to comment

Marianne Moore once proposed that beauty was everlasting but dust was only for a time. Australian artists Ujin Lee and Tom Edwards would likely argue that dust’s time can hold everlasting beauty of its own. “Dust” is an ongoing photography project that captures projections of a billowing substance in a number of different settings. The extremely high shutter speed photography captures the changing and fading dust in a state not normally viewed, frozen in motion before crashing to the ground. The results of the project can not adequately be described in words, but must be viewed to be fully appreciated.

Ujin Lee and Tom Edwards - From the project 'Dust'

Ujin Lee and Tom Edwards - From the project 'Dust'

Ujin Lee and Tom Edwards - From the project 'Dust'

Ujin Lee and Tom Edwards - From the project 'Dust'

The use of light and shadow in each shot helps draw a strong sense of depth to each photograph giving a sharp sense of substance to fine particles rarely given a second thought and often dismissed as a nuisance.

Ujin Lee and Tom Edwards - From the project 'Dust'

Ujin Lee and Tom Edwards - From the project 'Dust'

Ujin Lee and Tom Edwards - From the project 'Dust'

Ujin Lee and Tom Edwards - From the project 'Dust'

The ghostly-looking focus of each shot is haunting amid its cold and simple presence. And while each shot contains the same basic principles, each selected work showcases the “dust” in unique and profound form.

Ujin Lee and Tom Edwards - From the project 'Dust'

Ujin Lee and Tom Edwards - From the project 'Dust'

Masters of the beauty in the unusual or just having too much fun beating chalk erasers together? Vote below and give us your opinion.

View Ujin Lee’s website here.
Found through TrendLand and FIELD

Zwelethu Mthethwa – Apartheid and Lasting Segregation

Posted in Photography on March 12th, 2010 by Moose – 1 Comment

In 1994, following a series of negotiations dismantling the policy of apartheid in South Africa, all citizens of South Africa voted in the nation’s first general election held absent of racial limitations. The historic vote placed the African National Congress in power and began a powerful change in the exposure of South Africa to the rest of the world. Following the end of apartheid, the culture and art of ethnic Africans was no longer subject to the censorship of the ruling parties. Photography, especially that displaying the social and economic disparity between the classes, was brought to wide-spread, world attention.

Zwelethu Mthethwa - Untitled

Zwelethu Mthethwa - Untitled

Zwelethu Mthethwa - Untitled

Zwelethu Mthethwa - Untitled

Zwelethu Mthethwa - Untitled

Zwelethu Mthethwa - Untitled

Zwelethu Mthethwa of Durban has chronicled the history and current state of his country in several series of large-format photographs which have made their tour of galleries worldwide in ongoing conversation of the cultural identities of the disenfranchised and the relationship of South Africa with the global community.

Zwelethu Mthethwa - Untitled

Zwelethu Mthethwa - Untitled

Zwelethu Mthethwa - Untitled

Zwelethu Mthethwa - Untitled

The Aperture Foundation and its publishing arm have recently chosen to feature Mthethwa in a comprehensive monograph of the artist’s work to date. Scheduled to be released on 31 March 2010, Zwelethu Mthethwa takes the viewer across the landscapes and fields worked by rural denizens and into the homes and places of worship of native South Africans in an attempt to paint an accurate portrait of South African life to balance world perspectives on progress in the nation and afro-pessimism.

Zwelethu Mthethwa - Untitled

Zwelethu Mthethwa - Untitled

Zwelethu Mthethwa - Untitled

Zwelethu Mthethwa - Untitled

Pictures and information courtesy of African Colours, Aperture, and Art Slope

Social survey, or simply snapshots? Select below.

Light Graffiti – Ben Matthews

Posted in Photography on February 26th, 2010 by Moose – Be the first to comment

Some artists work on canvas. Others in cast metal or clay. Increasingly, more young artists have turned to the art of light painting as a way to decorate or alter a landscape or setting temporarily, capturing the effect on film to preserve permanently. Never seen it before? Here is an example from a young, British dentist, Ben Matthews.

Ben Matthews - Light Graffiti

Ben’s use of light coupled with a slow shutter speed is hardly a new medium—most photographers with single lens reflex cameras have experimented with this “technique”—but Matthews goes further than most with the creation and composition of a scene. His images are not merely the wild waving arms of someone with a glowstick in the dark, and many of his works include the figure of the artist himself.

Ben Matthews - Light Graffiti

Ben also must ride skateboards, or have friends who ride, as a number of his creations revolve around halfpipes. The following displays the trail of a boarder, whose path is traced in light back and forth across the structure.

Ben Matthews - Light Graffiti

Juvenile delinquent, or clever painter? Make your choice.

Read and see more on TimesOnline and Telegraph.co.uk.